A beginner’s guide to Building and Hosting a Web Page Web design and development is incredibly fun. For those just getting started, I’ve developed the following guide to take you through all of the steps necessary to successfully embark on your web design and development adventure!

A) Index:

PRE: The 3 D’s

1. Gathering
2. Concept
3. Photoshop
4. Client Approval #1
5. HTML (front-end)
6. Code (back-end)
7. Client Approval #2
8. Uploading & Testing

B) Tools Required: (I’ll go through all of these tools in detail below)

1. Pencil
2. Paper
3. Photoshop (or other design tool)
4. Dreamweaver (or other web-development tool)
5. Copies of all the common browsers (see below for more info)
6. Filezilla (or other FTP tool to communicate with your web server)
7. Domain Name (your www. address)
8. Web Host such as GoDaddy (or something similar)
9. A computer
10. A passion for being creative!

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A) Index:

PRE: The 3 D’s

All websites in the world require 3 things.

A Domain Name. Through companies like GoDaddy, you can purchase names for small fees per year. If the name you want is something popular, consider purchasing it at the beginning of your build-process, after all, it’s good for a year.

A Dedicated Host Once you’ve selected a hosting package, you’ll have to log in and set everything up. You’ll have to point, or park your domain name at your hosting setup as well. Once all of that’s done, setup your FTP program so you’re connections to your server are working.

A Designed, and Developed Web Site (your stuff!). This tutorial will cover off on this one!

1. Gathering

The type of site you use and the tools you’ll need will vary a lot depending on the requirements of your client. A website built to do nothing but show pictures will have significantly different technology in the back-end than a page built to allow for discussions. Likewise, a site built for security with employee data and a login system will look entirely different yet.

Knowing what your client needs is the first real step in the building process. Make yourself a checklist and take it with you when you speak with your clients. Over time develop the checklist into a comprehensive consultation document. Be prepared for additional chat though. The most critical component of early web building is proper communication to ensure you and your client remain on the same ‘design’ page. The last thing you want to do is misinterpret their interests and spend 5-6 hours building something they didn’t want in the first place.

2. Concept

You’ve got all of your initial information. Now it’s time to sketch our concept design. You DO NOT need to be an artist for this. The purpose of this concept phase is to remove the computer and other distractions so you can visualize the design in your head

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